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Once your Major Subject has been confirmed, the Faculty Office will ask you to state your preferred Minor Subject by 1st August. Some Minor Subjects have limited places, and if these are over-subscribed the departments concerned will select their own students.

On this page you will find information to help you choose your Minor Subject:

 Departments offering BBS Minor Subjects

Click on the tiles below to visit corresponding departmental webpages

 

 

 

Minor Subjects short description

The links below are, when possible, specific to a given Minor subject.

Paper Short Description (see links for more detailed information)
104 - Human Evolution

This course provides an in depth exploration of the evolutionary history of humans and hominins. The paper looks at human evolution from ca. 10 million years ago to 10,000 years ago. Contact hours: 27h

Maximum 10+ candidates

 

105 - Human Ecology and Behaviour

This paper examines human and other primate behaviour in a broad comparative perspective. Non-human primate social communication across all sense modalities will be reviewed in the context of the social organization of the various primate species. The paper will also consider what primate and human communication have in common, and will discuss the evolution of human language. Contact hours: 32h

Maximum 10+ candidates

 

107 - Philosophy & Ethics of Medicine

Do we have a human right to health? What is it to be healthy anyway, and can good health be measured? How can we know that smoking causes lung cancer, rather than that they are merely correlated? Is it ethical to experiment on humans to gain that knowledge? Is the foetus a person, and does this affect the morality of abortion? How should we decide between funding basic science and applied studies? Medical practice raises significant philosophical, ethical and political questions. This course studies these questions and shows how different answers may influence practice. Contact hours: 24h lectures + 4-6h supervisions

Maximum 50 candidates

108 - Health, Medicine and Society

This paper provides students with a critical survey of principal themes and debates in contemporary medical sociology. It explores the major social causes of health and illness in modern societies, with special reference to such factors as social class, gender, ethnicity, and age; provides students with a sociological grasp of the issues and problems associated with chronic illness; investigates a variety of key topics in the sociology of mental health; and, finally, develops a sociological analysis of the major organisational, professional and technological components of medical practice in contemporary society. Contact hours: 20h

Maximum 10 candidates

109 - The Family

Psychological and sociological perspectives on family relationships, kinship and child development are examined in relation to specific topics such as motherhood, fatherhood, adolescence, marriage and divorce, single-parent and step-families, lesbian and gay families, and families created by assisted reproduction. Contact hours: 32h

Maximum 10 candidates

111 - Higher Order Brain Functions and Dysfunctions

This module aims to give students an understanding of important principles in contemporary neuroscience at cellular and molecular levels. The lectures will cover voltage-dependent ion channels and their role in electrical signalling, ligand-gated ion channels and their role in synaptic transmission, intracellular signalling in neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, sensory transduction mechanisms, and cellular techniques applied to circuit neuroscience. The module introduces concepts that will be useful for a deeper understanding of brain function. 

Maximum 15 candidates

113 - Early Medicine

This paper covers medical knowledge and practices in the medieval and early modern periods. Themes include tradition, innovation and the transmission of knowledge; the value of reason and experience; patient-practitioner relationships; gender and medicine; pluralism and the marketplace; understandings of the body and disease; medicine, magic and religion. Contact hours: 24h lectures + 4-6h supervisions

Maximum 12 candidates

114 - Modern Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Born in hospitals, vaccinated, X-rayed, taking antibiotics, receiving transplants – medicine sets the parameters of our lives. Since a great deal of biology, chemistry and physics has been and continues to be done as part of medicine, it is also central to HPS. This paper is about how, and with what consequences, a new, scientific medicine was made for the modern world. The Michaelmas Term course surveys the creation since 1750 of new medical institutions, professionals and practices. The Lent Term course explores the 20th-century transformation of medicine into a major object of economic, political and ethical concern. Contact hours: 24h lectures + 4-6h supervisions

Maximum 12 candidates

120 - Human Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology

Human genetics has always had to exploit technology to obtain answers to the problems it poses. The module explores how we can use information from the Human Genome Project, together with methods for analysing gene expression and function at the whole-genome scale (Systems Biology) to improve our understanding of human biology. Contact hours: 26h

Maximum 10 candidates

121 - Evolutionary Genetics & Adaptation

This module will consider the process of evolution, by looking at studies on genetic variation in populations, together with theoretical examinations of the way that genes behave in populations. Contact hours: 26h

Maximum 10 candidates

124 - Advanced Topics in Social and Applied Psychology

 

This course will include the following lecture topics: Advanced Topics in Personality and Individual Differences, Applying Behavioural Insights and Influence and Persuasion in the Digital Age.

Maximum 10 candidates

126 - Music Psychology(Part II paper 17)

Musicality is a uniquely human phenomenon that spans diverse aspects of human biology and psychology, such as pitch perception, auditory scene analysis, entrainment, prediction, motor control, and memory. The Music Psychology course addresses this fascinating topic in two strands. The first strand involves diving deep into a selection of particular research topics in music psychology, guided by key academic papers in the field. The second strand involves each student developing their own research proposal on a music psychology topic of the student's choosing, which is workshopped in classes and supervisions over the course of the year. Contact hours: 12h

Maximum 3 candidatesThis course does not have strict prerequisites. However, it will be helpful if the student has some knowledge of Western music theory (e.g. able to read music notation) and of psychological research methods (e.g. knowledge of standard research designs and statistical tests).

127 - Conservation Science This interdepartmental course, taught by the Departments of Zoology and Plant Sciences, aims to provide an understanding of why wild nature is currently in decline, why this matters, and how biology coupled with other disciplines can be harnessed to identify potential solutions. Contact hours: 27h
128 - Bioinformatics

This course introduces the fundamental bioinformatic concepts and methodologies used to analyse biological data. It is structured around two main blocks; data science for bioinformatics, and bioinformatics approaches to omics and analysis of biological data.

More information and handbook can be found here

Maximum 46 candidates

129 - Applied Clinical Research

Returning for 2023-24

The aim of the module is to provide students with knowledge, skills and practical experience to understand the importance and challenges of applied clinical research and to offer a platform for developing further expertise in it during their clinical studies and beyond. Should they wish, students will be able further to develop their work in this module, through Student Selected Components in Year 4 of the Cambridge Clinical Course.

The course is open to applicants from both MVST and NST, although it is anticipated that it is likely to appeal more to the former. There are no essential or desirable pre-requisite courses that applicant students should have studied previously in either Tripos.

Maximum 12 candidates, minimum of 6.

132 - Evolution and Comparative Anatomy of Mammals

In this module, we examine the evolution of ourselves and our closest relative, from an ancestor that existed over 300 million years ago to the diversity of bats, whales, lemurs, rabbits, elephants, sloths, koalas, echidnas and many other living species. Using the Tree of Life and comparative anatomy as our guides, we will explore how mammals adapt and thrive everywhere, from deserts and oceans and from poles to tropics.

We note how genomics have revolutionized our understanding of Life's evolutionary tree, yet also confirmed basic ideas about this Tree outlined in the 19th century. We explore links between DNA and development, and consider how genomes can exhibit their ouw fossil record. We will observe the extraordinary commonalities shared by animals as diverse as blue whales and tarsiers, and the major differences between animals that at first glance appear to be similar, such as talpid and afrotherian moles. We furthermore consider the "Ice Age", the rich and growing field of palaeogenetics, ther emergence of humanity, and the profound effects of domestication on animal morphology and behaviour. We note key lines of evidence that document climate variability and the responses of species to repeated changes in ice cover and sea levels, fluctuations which help explain, among many other phenomena, the distinctive yet essentially European identity of the British Isles. Biological natural science students taking this course will recognize themes from their first two years, such as development, reproduction and ecology. Vets and medics will be familiar with anatomical concepts, computerized tomography, and histological data used in our course. All students will appreciate how the anatomy of humans, their livestock and pets exhibit commonalities and contrasts with non-model species, from armadillos to Thrinaxodon. Ecologists, cell-biologists and any other Part II student will recognize topics concerning our own biology and place in the Tree of Life. This is an independent, self-contained module and there are no prerequisties needed to do well in L1.

134 – From Genome to Proteome

This BBS minor subject comprises Module B from the Part II Biochemistry course. This course examines all steps in eukaryotic gene expression, from chromatin accessibility through to translation and mRNA turnover. Particular emphasis is paid to: regulation of gene expression, the co-transcriptional nature of RNA processing, functional coupling between different steps in gene expression, the impact of global and “systems” level approaches to understanding gene expression.
The course consists of 24 hours of core lectures. Q+A sessions as offered by some lecturers in addition.  Specialized supervisions in small groups are available for any student who requests them. These are student organized with guidance for the Department of Biochemistry. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 10 candidates – Selection criteria

137 - Surgical and Radiological Anatomy

 

This course introduces students to areas of anatomy that are especially relevant to surgical and radiological procedures. The need for a good working knowledge of anatomy in surgical and radiological practice is of course paramount in clinical safety. Applicants for Core Surgical Training and Specialty Radiology Training may improve their scores in the “Experience in and commitment to specialty” component by having chosen to take a relevant module such as this course. Students also choose one practical activity from the following options: attendance at operating theatre sessions; diagnostic and/or interventional radiology session; or preparation of an anatomical prosection. Assessment includes a 1-hour Short Answer Questions paper, a short written report and oral presentation on the practical session. Lecturers are current consultant radiologists and surgeons. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 24 candidates - Selection criteria

Course booklet

138 - Developmental Neurobiology

 

This module addresses how the nervous system is assembled during embryonic development. Although we now understand a considerable amount about the processes involved, many fascinating questions remain. This module will explore: the formation of the vertebrate neural tube; how this is patterned to generate distinct neuronal and glial cell fates in different regions; the formation of the peripheral nervous system from the migratory neural crest and cranial neurogenic placodes; the process of axon guidance; how axons make and refine the synapses that will generate functional neural circuits; how circuit designs lead to function; and the nervous system evolution (‘evo-devo’). Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 5 candidates

141 - Cellular Physiology

 

Cells detect and respond to changes in their external environment through a cornucopia of signalling pathways. Many of the pathways involve complex biochemical reactions, but some are more amenable to study by the physiologist – in particular membrane potential, calcium and pH. Thus, in this module we look at cellular signalling from a Physiological viewpoint rather than 'stamp collecting' all of the signalling pathways. The three main signalling mechanisms we have selected here are used by both excitable and in-excitable cells to transmit information from the cell surface to effector systems: the basic ionic regulation mechanisms that allow signalling to exist; the ion channels that allow calcium into cells; intracellular calcium signalling. The calcium signals also result in pH microdomains, which are also potential signals. We consider how ligands can result in potential changes and how these potential changes can be modified by signalling pathways. We end the series of lectures by bringing together membrane potential changes and calcium signalling with lectures on skeletal muscle and meta plasticity. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 5 candidates

142 - Development and Stem Cells

 

The transformation of a fertilised egg into an embryo encompasses a series of fundamental cellular events that culminate in the divergence of the embryonic and extra-embryonic cell lineages. During this process the initial totipotent egg generates cells that, progressively become restricted to different fates. The first differentiation event is a separation between extra-embryonic trophectoderm and the pluripotent embryonic inner cell mass, and the second, within the inner cell mass, between the embryonic epiblast and the extra-embryonic primitive endoderm. In this module we will explore how these cell fate decisions are taken and what transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifications reinforce them. We will also consider subsequent functions of the extra-embryonic lineages, and how interactions between the trophectoderm and the maternal tissues lead to implantation and establishment of a successful pregnancy. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 5 candidates

143 - Systems and Clinical Physiology

 

Systems physiology is central to the practice of scientific medicine. The idea behind this module is to give you a more detailed view of some aspects of systems physiology and to include some clinically oriented material that is of particular importance to the practising doctor. Cardiovascular topics include cardiac arrhythmias, the genetics and energetics of heart failure and a look at the pulmonary circulation from a clinical viewpoint. Renal physiology includes autoregulation, osmoregulation and acute and chronic renal failure. Several areas of endocrine physiology are explored in the form of pancreatic islet and gut hormones, brain control of food intake, the ever increasing problem of diabetes mellitus and the physiology and pathophysiology of bone. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 5 candidates

144 - Plant Signalling Networks in Growth and Development

 

In this lecture course you will learn about the components of signalling systems involved in physiological and developmental responses to the environment and how these components are organised into elegant networks.

The lecture material will introduce you to the elements that make up signalling networks and also place these elements in context. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

145 - Microbes: Evolution, Genomes and Lifestyle

 

This course explores microorganisms with relevance to understanding plant biology including the major groups of microbes, the environmental and evolutionary transition of microbes to endosymbiotic organelles, as well as beneficial and detrimental interactions between plants and microbes. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

146 - Evolution and Ecosystems Dynamics

 

The phylogenetic progression of land plants allows us to relate palaeohistorical origins, from algae to bryophytes and lycopods, to their evolutionary progression through ferns and conifers to angiosperms. The module will examine the molecular basis to morphological advances, as compared to the physiological progression. The diversity engendered within, and beneath forest canopies, and the historical ecology of today’s landscape, complete our review of vegetation history and dynamics. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

147 - Plant Genomes and Synthetic Biology

 

Dobzhansky said in 1973 that “nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution”. In 2015 he might have gone on to point out that “genomes reflect evolution and so we can make sense of biology by studying genomes”. He would be able to make this point because, from next generation sequencing and other powerful new methods, we now appreciate that nuclear genomes are much more than a linear array of coding sequence genes. They are a complex array of structural and regulatory components interspersed with genes for both coding and non coding RNAs. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

148 - Responses to Global Change

 

Temperatures are rising, land cover is changing, and people are moving pests and pathogens around the world at unprecedented rates – in short, we have never seen such changes in the history of humans.
Understanding what is happening, and why, will allow us to respond to these changes, potentially making a huge difference to what survives and how we humans live. This course explores changes in animals, plants, and their physical environment, and then shows how modelling approaches can help to predict the future. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

149 - Exploiting Plant Metabolism

 

Understanding plant metabolism informs our production of food, fuel and many high‐value products. Modifying these metabolic pathways therefore provides the opportunity to contribute to more productive and sustainable societies. However, the complexity of metabolic systems leads to major intellectual challenges, both in terms of understanding but also in manipulating each system. Contact hours: 24h
Maximum 3 candidates

151 - Comparative Human Biology

This paper examines the biology of our species in the context of non-human primate and wider mammalian variation.

The paper covers diverse aspects of human biology, including anatomy, physiology, behaviour, cognition, growth patterns and life-history characteristics. It considers the ways in which our biology differs from that of our closest living relatives, the non-human primates, as well as mammals and vertebrates more broadly. It will also explore biological variation within and between human populations, drawing on evidence from both past and contemporary human populations by combining perspectives from the fields of Palaeoanthropology, Evolutionary Genetics, Osteoarchaeology and Human Biology. The paper will consider not only how we vary, but why, discussing both the underlying evolutionary mechanisms (such as natural selection, neutral variation and epigenetics), as well as the developmental basis of the variation we observe. Contact hours: 27h

Maximum 10+ candidates

152 - Neuroscience: Circuits and Systems

The biggest question in neuroscience is widely considered how to use our knowledge of molecular and cellular properties to explain cognitive functions and behaviours. This module considers this problem by focusing on conceptual, experimental, and computational approaches to circuit/system understanding in a range of systems (invertebrate to mammalian). This includes sensory-motor function in Drosophila, mammalian reproductive function, cerebellar circuits underlying motor learning and behaviour, and visual and vestibular systems. In addition to lectures, interactive discussions will focus on general aspects of circuit/system analyses that consider the relative merits of experimental and computational approaches, and how molecular and cellular properties can explain system function.

Maximum 5 candidates

153 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

This module aims to give students an understanding of important principles in contemporary neuroscience at cellular and molecular levels. The lectures will cover voltage-dependent ion channels and their role in electrical signalling, ligand-gated ion channels and their role in synaptic transmission, intracellular signalling in neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, sensory transduction mechanisms, and cellular techniques applied to circuit neuroscience. The module introduces concepts that will be useful for a deeper understanding of brain function. 

Maximum 5 candidates

154 - Applied Ecology All too often, managers of natural resources make ill-informed decisions that can have devastating consequences upon ecosystems and the human populations who depend upon them. This module is about how a sound understanding of ecological processes can improve our ability to manage ecosystems. The course considers a diverse range of applications, from understanding disease epidemics, to predicting the future impacts of climate change. It also considers the role of applied ecology in a diverse range of environments, from the world’s most remote island groups and Polar regions, to familiar agricultural landscapes. As well as lectures, the course also includes sessions with applied ecologists from the David Attenborough Building, a field trip to RSPB's Hope Farm, and seminars that enable students to explore aspects of applied ecology in more detail.

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Minor Subjects Contact Details (AY22-23)

Paper Department Course/Module organiser Teaching administrator Contact email
104 - Human Evolution Archaeology

Dr Enrico Crema

Dr Sylvain Lemoine

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk
105 - Human Ecology and Behaviour Archaeology

Dr Enrico Crema

Dr Sylvain Lemoine

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk
107 - Philosophy & Ethics of Medicine HPS Dr Stephen John David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
108 - Health, Medicine and Society Sociology Dr Darin Weinberg
Paulina Baltsoukou
undergrad@sociology.cam.ac.uk
109 - The Family Psychology Professor Pasco Fearon Richard Sellens teaching@psychol.cam.ac.uk
111 - Central Mechanisms of Reward, Punishment and Emotion PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
113 - Early Medicine HPS

Dr Daniel Margocsy

David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
114 - Modern Medicine & Biomedical Sciences HPS Dr Salim Al-Gailani David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
120 - Human Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology Genetics

Dr Christine Farr

Amy Bains undergrad.admin@gen.cam.ac.uk
121 - Evolutionary Genetics and Adaptation Genetics/Zoology

Dr Christine Farr

Amy Bains undergrad.admin@gen.cam.ac.uk
124 - Advanced Topics in Social and Applied Psychology Psychology Professor Sander van der Linden Richard Sellens teaching@psychol.cam.ac.uk

126 - Music Psychology

Music Peter Harrison Juliet Margerison undergraduate@mus.cam.ac.uk
127 - Conservation Science Zoology Professor Walter Federle Francesca Anthony teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk
128 - Bioinformatics Genetics Dr Alexia Cardona Cathy Hemmings cgh32@cam.ac.uk

130 - Vertebrate Evolution

Zoology

Professor Walter Federle

Francesca Anthony

teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk

132 – Evolution and Comparative Anatomy of Mammals Zoology Professor Walter Federle Francesca Anthony teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk

134 – From Genome to Proteome

Biochemistry

Dr Phil Zegerman

Heather Platt ug-admin@bioc.cam.ac.uk

135 – Cell Cycle, Signalling and Cancer

Biochemistry

Dr Phil Zegerman

Heather Platt

ug-admin@bioc.cam.ac.uk

136 - Science Communication

Institute of Continuing Education

Dr Jane Gregory

TBC

scicomm@ice.cam.ac.uk

137 - Surgical and Radiological Anatomy PDN

Professor Cecilia Brassett

Jade de Quincey hacteaching@pdn.cam.ac.uk
138 - Developmental Neurobiology PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
139 - Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
140 - Sensory Transduction PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
141 - Cellular Physiology PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
142 - Development and Stem Cells PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
143 - Systems and Clinical Physiology PDN

Dr Hannah Clarke

Professor Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
144 - Plant Signalling Networks in Growth and Development Plant Sciences Dr Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
145 - Microbes: Evolution, Genomes and Lifestyle Plant Sciences Dr Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
146 - Evolution and Ecosystems Dynamics Plant Sciences Dr Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
147 - Plant Genomes and Synthetic Biology Plant Sciences Dr Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
148 - Responses to Global Change Plant Sciences Professor Andrew Tanentzap Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
149 - Exploiting Plant Metabolism Plant Sciences Dr Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
151 - Comparative Human Biology Archaeology

Dr Enrico Crema

Dr Sylvain Lemoine

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk

 

Minor Subjects Contact Details (AY23-24)

Paper Department Course/Module organiser Teaching administrator Contact email
104 - Human Evolution Archaeology

Part II Co-ordinator: TBC

Paper Co-ordinator: Prof. Marta Mirazon Lahr

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk
105 - Human Ecology and Behaviour Archaeology

Part II Co-ordinator: TBC

Paper Co-ordinator: Dr Nikhil Chaudhary

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk
107 - Philosophy & Ethics of Medicine HPS Dr Stephen John David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
108 - Health, Medicine and Society Sociology Dr Darin Weinberg
Paulina Baltsoukou
undergrad@sociology.cam.ac.uk
109 - The Family Psychology Prof Pasco Fearon Richard Sellens teaching@psychol.cam.ac.uk
111 - Higher Order Brain Functions and Dysfunctions PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
113 - Early Medicine HPS

Dr Daniel Margocsy

David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
114 - Modern Medicine & Biomedical Sciences HPS Dr Salim Al-Gailani David Thompson hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk
120 - Human Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology Genetics

Dr Christine Farr

Amy Bains undergrad.admin@gen.cam.ac.uk
121 - Evolutionary Genetics and Adaptation Genetics/Zoology

Dr Christine Farr

Amy Bains undergrad.admin@gen.cam.ac.uk
124 - Advanced Topics in Social and Applied Psychology Psychology Prof Sander van der Linden Richard Sellens teaching@psychol.cam.ac.uk

126 - Music Psychology

Music Dr Peter Harrison Juliet Margerison undergraduate@mus.cam.ac.uk
127 - Conservation Science Zoology

Course Organiser: Prof Walter Federle

Module Organiser: Professor Andrew Balmford

Francesca Anthony teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk
128 - Bioinformatics Genetics Dr Alexia Cardona Cathy Hemmings cgh32@cam.ac.uk
129 - Applied Clinical Research Public Health and Primary Care Dr Juliet Usher-Smith Connie Tang pyt20@medschl.cam.ac.uk
132 – Evolution and Comparative Anatomy of Mammals Zoology

Course Organiser: Prof Walter Federle

Module Organiser: Dr Robert Asher

Francesca Anthony teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk

134 – From Genome to Proteome

Biochemistry

Dr Phil Zegerman

Heather Platt ug-admin@bioc.cam.ac.uk
137 - Surgical and Radiological Anatomy PDN

Prof Cecilia Brassett

Jade de Quincey hacteaching@pdn.cam.ac.uk
138 - Developmental Neurobiology PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
141 - Cellular Physiology PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
142 - Development and Stem Cells PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
143 - Systems and Clinical Physiology PDN

Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri

Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
144 - Plant Signalling Networks in Growth and Development Plant Sciences Prof Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
145 - Microbes: Evolution, Genomes and Lifestyle Plant Sciences Prof Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
146 - Evolution and Ecosystems Dynamics Plant Sciences Prof Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
147 - Plant Genomes and Synthetic Biology Plant Sciences Prof Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
148 - Responses to Global Change Plant Sciences TBC Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
149 - Exploiting Plant Metabolism Plant Sciences Prof Ian Henderson Rhyanna Halasovski ugadmin@plantsci.cam.ac.uk
151 - Comparative Human Biology Archaeology

Part II Co-ordinator: TBC

Paper Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Dyble

Josh Giles undergraduate-secretary@arch.cam.ac.uk
152 - Neuroscience: Circuits and Systems PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
153 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience PDN Prof Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri Sophie Jones part2@pdn.cam.ac.uk
154 - Applied Ecology Zoology

Course Organiser: Prof Walter Federle

Module Organiser: Prof Edgar Turner

Francesca Anthony teaching@zoo.cam.ac.uk

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